Tag Archives: Fresh Juicing

Jay’s Holiday Dozen Day Five Cabbage Carrot Celery

This is Day Five of 12 consecutive posts with Jay demonstrating how to make each juice recipe. Also included is nutrition and research information to compliment Jay’s choice of fruit and/or vegetable drinks.  Happy Holidays from all of us at JayKordich.com

Day Five –  Cabbage Carrot Celery

Most of the time those of us involved in promoting natural foods are prohibited from using the word Cure.  This is one of those times where it’s entirely appropriate and accurate to talk about curing ulcers by simply drinking freshly made cabbage juice. We have the published, peer reviewed scientific study to back it up.

In fact Jay himself, assisting Dr. Garnett Cheney in 1949 at Stanford University Medical School Cancer Division, treated patients by having them drink freshly made cabbage juice. Out of 65 patients in the study, 63 were healed and the remaining two patients had minimal symptoms as a result.

Recently we asked Jay to recall that time many years ago and tell us how it all transpired. The video below is Jay in his own words.

Download your own copy of the original Stanford University Medical Center study by Dr. Garnett Cheney. Click on this link or the study photo on the right to download a PDF version.

RECIPE:
- About 1/3 of the glass for each, cabbage, carrot, celery.
- If you are using this combination to get serious about a stomach problem you should try for a larger percentage of cabbage to carrot and celery, say about 50% cabbage.

An excellent quality juice machine is also recommended. Fortunately we can suggest Jay’s own PowerGrind Pro for the job! Here’s Jay to make Cabbage Carrot Celery juice

 

 

The Healing Power of Green Juice

BLOOD TONICS…..Are YOU Blood deficient? have you ever had your blood drawn and looked at through a microscope? You will see something quite interesting. Either your red blood cells are plump, round and healthy, or they are distorted, full of parasites or they are not well oxygenated. I am sharing some of the MOST successful green tonics that WILL bring the oxygen back to your blood cells and restore them, creating plump, round, healthy and vibrant. THIS tonic is VERY special. Please try to drink it at least 3 times a week, and daily if you have deficient blood.

(for 2 ~ Organic only)

6 ALFALFA Leaves, fresh
1 SPINACH, (1 cup, packed)
1 PARSLEY, (1 cup, packed)
1 CUCUMBER (unwaxed, English)
6 CELERY (6 ribs from the stalk)
6 DANDELION (leaves)
1 LIME (large with skin)

This is one of the most powerful, super low glycemic TONICS you can take for your blood. We have seen miracles in people’s bloodwork in just weeks. Please SHARE THIS INFORMATION! It is crucial we share this with everyone. Jay  Remember, that the human blood is almost identical to the blood of the green plant.

The Powerful Healing Properties of Beet Juice

The benefits of making fresh beet juices are numerous.  We feel it’s the best root vegetable for cleansing the liver/gall bladder.

High in nutrients, this overlooked root which spends its entire life underground until it comes to the table. It is not only a liver cleanser and blood builder, but contains antioxidant properties, as well.  Jay and I love to juice beets and use them in combinations…… because they can be highly powerful and will make your throat feel scratchy, or it will effect your vocal chords if done in excess.

What does in ‘excess’ mean?  Don’t do more than 1 large beet at a time, and never juice beets straight, unless you have learned to build up a tolerance for it.

Here are the kinds of combinations we recommend: (for 2 people and always organic please!)

1 large beet with its greens

2 Red Delicious Apples

1 Large Red Bell Pepper

1 Large English Cucumber

1 small slice of fresh ginger root

This tonic is quite red!  It’s beautiful and can give you a huge burst of energy.  Please share this tonic with another person, it’s meant for two people.

Nutrients:Beets are a source of Vitamin A, B, (folic acid) C, iron, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, carotenoids and dietary fiber, unless of course you are juicing them.  You can keep the pulp and use the pulp for a good VEGETABLE soup as a base, especially if you are going to add carrots to any tonic with beets.

Liver Cleanser:

Beet Root is used to not only detoxify the liver and spleen, but helps with treatment of many other liver ailments, such as cirrhosis, jaundice and other diseases of the liver.  PLEASE REMEMBER….beet juice will cause your urine and feces to turn a bit red, so don’t be alarmed.

Blood Builder: Beet juice stimulates the lymph fluid (the straw-colored portion of the blood).  Beets are also good for building blood as well as helping to balance the blood’s pH balance by reducing the blood’s acidity.

Low Level Iron:

Corpuscles are blood cells which may contain excess accumulations of fat.  By removing the excess corpuscle fats, they can be eliminated from the body.  Let’s clean out those corpuscles!  I just wish everybody would or could understand just how powerful fresh vegetable juices can be for recooperating the body from disease, and/or from congestion. Especially beets are quick to help and cleanse and purify.

We recommend juice 5 to 7 beets per week for two weeks, combined of course with other vegetables as mentioned above.  Afte these two weeks, you will notice your blood will be quite rich and clean.  You can do this a few weeks before you have to go the Doctor and see what he says when he takes your next blood test, but remember, THIS is not the only thing you need to do to keep your blood clean…..stay ALKALINE with your juices and food as well, with no caffeine, sugar, alcohol or white foods.

Our book, Live Foods Live Bodies has a tremendous amount of great juicing recipes, including beet recipes, or our original book, The Juiceman’s Power of Juicing has a plethora of wonderful juice combinations I have been using for over 6 decades.

Happy Juicing!

Jay Kordich

Cantaloupe ~ Nature’s Finest Fruit!

I have been eating cantaloupes for over 80 years. And I have been juicing them for over 62 years, and Linda and I never tire of them.  I want to make sure you are juicing them as well, so I thought I would write a quick note about CANTALOUPES.

How to Juice: Peel your cantaloupes (unless they are organic and scrubbed very well) cut in long strips and juice entire cantaloupe, minus the seeds.  We add some fresh ginger root to the juice in the mornings to give it a little zest.  One cantaloupe (medium size) can juice more than a quart.  NEVER let your cantaloupe juice sit without refrigeration, and if you are saving it, it will only last 5 hours. So it’s best to juice it and then drink it immediately. Vitamin C in the juice along with the natural enzymes and lifeforce start to die immediately after you break open the cells of the fruit.
Here’s the Benefits:

Cantaloupe Gets an A+
Our food ranking system qualified cantaloupe as an excellent source of vitamin A on account of its concentrated beta-carotene content. Once inside the body, beta-carotene can be converted into vitamin A, so when you eat cantaloupe it’s like getting both these beneficial nutrients at once. One cup of cantaloupe is just 56 calories, but provides 103.2% of the daily value for vitamin A. Both vitamin A and beta-carotene are important vision nutrients. In a study of over 50,000 women nurses aged 45 to 67, women who consumed the highest dietary amount of vitamin A had a 39% reduced risk of developing cataracts. In another study that looked at the incidence of cataract surgery and diet, researchers found that those people who ate diets that included cantaloupe had half the risk of cataract surgery, while those who ate the highest amounts of butter, salt and total fat had higher risks for cataract surgery. Beta-carotene has also been the subject of extensive research in relationship to cancer prevention and prevention of oxygen-based damage to cells.
Cantaloupe also emerged from our food ranking system as an excellent source of vitamin C. While beta-carotene and vitamin A are fat-soluble antioxidants, vitamin C functions as an antioxidant in the water-soluble areas of the body. So, between its beta-carotene and vitamin C content, cantaloupe has all areas covered against damage from oxygen free radicals. In addition to its antioxidant activity, vitamin C is critical for good immune function. Vitamin C stimulates white cells to fight infection, directly kills many bacteria and viruses, and regenerates Vitamin E after it has been inactivated by disarming free radicals. Owing to the multitude of vitamin C’s health benefits, it is not surprising that research has shown that consumption of vegetables and fruits high in this nutrient is associated with a reduced risk of death from all causes including heart disease, stroke and cancer. One cup of cantaloupe contains 112.5% of the daily value for this well-known antioxidant.
In our food ranking system, cantaloupe also qualified as a very good source of potassium and a good source of vitamin B6,dietary fiber, folate, and niacin (vitamin B3). The combination of all these B complex vitamins along with the fiber found in cantaloupe make it an exceptionally good fruit for supporting energy production through good carbohydrate metabolism and blood sugar stability. These B complex vitamins are required in our cells for processing carbohydrates (including sugars), and cantaloupe’s fiber helps ensure cantaloupe’s sugars are delivered into the bloodstream gradually, keeping blood sugar on an even keel.
Cantaloupe’s Pro-vitamin A Promotes Lung Health.
If you or someone you love is a smoker, or if you are frequently exposed to secondhand smoke, then making vitamin A-rich foods, such as cantaloupe, part of your healthy way of eating may save your life, suggests research conducted at Kansas State University.
While studying the relationship between vitamin A, lung inflammation, and emphysema, Richard Baybutt, associate professor of nutrition at Kansas State, made a surprising discovery: a common carcinogen in cigarette smoke, benzo(a)pyrene, induces vitamin A deficiency.
Baybutt’s earlier research had shown that animals fed a vitamin A-deficient diet developed emphysema. His latest animal studies indicate that not only does the benzo(a)pyrene in cigarette smoke cause vitamin A deficiency, but that a diet rich in vitamin A can help counter this effect, thus greatly reducing emphysema.
Baybutt believes vitamin A’s protective effects may help explain why some smokers do not develop emphysema. “There are a lot of people who live to be 90 years old and are smokers,” he said. “Why? Probably because of their diet…The implications are that those who start smoking at an early age are more likely to become vitamin A deficient and develop complications associated with cancer and emphysema. And if they have a poor diet, forget it.”
If you or someone you love smokes, or if your work necessitates exposure to second hand smoke, protect yourself by making sure that at least one of the World’s Healthiest Foods that are rich in vitamin A, such as cantaloupe, is a daily part of your healthy way of eating.

Protect Your Vision with Cantaloupe
Your mother may have told you carrots would keep your eyes bright as a child, but as an adult, it looks like fruit is even more important for keeping your sight. Data reported in a study published in the Archives of Ophthalmology indicates that eating 3 or more servings of fruit per day may lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the primary cause of vision loss in older adults, by 36%, compared to persons who consume less than 1.5 servings of fruit daily.
In this study, which involved over 100,000 women and men, researchers evaluated the effect of study participants’ consumption of fruits; vegetables; the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E; and carotenoids on the development of early ARMD or neovascular ARMD, a more severe form of the illness associated with vision loss. Food intake information was collected periodically for up to 18 years for women and 12 years for men.
While, surprisingly, intakes of vegetables, antioxidant vitamins and carotenoids were not strongly related to incidence of either form of ARMD, fruit intake was definitely protective against the severe form of this vision-destroying disease.
Three servings of fruit may sound like a lot to eat each day, but by simply slicing some cantaloupe over your morning cereal, topping off a cup of yogurt or green salad with a half cup of berries, and snacking on an apple, plum, nectarine or pear, you’ve reached this goal.
Description

The fruit that we call the cantaloupe is, in actuality, really a muskmelon. The true cantaloupe is a different species of melon that is mostly grown in France and rarely found in the United States. It derives its name from the Italian papal village of Cantalup where it was first cultivated around 1700 A.D. From hereon, we will still use the term “cantaloupe” when referring to the muskmelon.
The cantaloupe is a melon that belongs to the same family as the cucumber, squash, pumpkin and gourd, and like many of its relatives, it grows on the ground on a trailing vine. It is round or oval in shape and usually has a ribless rind. Having a distinctive netted skin, it is also referred to as netted melon. Many of the cantaloupes available today are hybrids of muskmelons and true cantaloupes and have qualities that reflect both.
Cantaloupes range in color from orange-yellow to salmon and have a soft and juicy texture with a sweet, musky aroma that emanates through the melon when it is ripe. Cantaloupes feature a hollow cavity that contains their seeds encased in a web of netting.
Cantaloupe is also known as rockmelon in several parts of the world. The scientific name for cantaloupe is Cucumis melo.
History
The exact origin of melons is unclear, although they are thought to have originated in either India, Africa or ancient Persia and have been cultivated in these lands since ancient times. Historical texts from Greek and Roman times note that these ancient civilizations enjoyed cantaloupes. They were introduced to the United States during colonial times but were not grown commercially until the very late 19th century. Today, major growers of cantaloupe include the United States, Turkey, Iran and many Central American countries.
How to Select and Store
The key to purchasing a good quality melon is to find one that is ripe, which is sometimes a challenge because oftentimes they are picked while still unripe in order to ensure that they make it through the shipping process undamaged. There are many clues that you can look for to find a melon that is ripe. If you tap the melon with the palm of your hand and hear a hollow sound, the melon has passed the first test.
Choose a melon that seems heavy for its size, and one that does not have bruises or overly soft spots. The rind, underneath the netting, should have turned to yellow or cream from the green undertones that the unripe fruit has. The “full slip,” the area where the stem was attached, should be smooth and slightly indented, free from remnants of the stem. The end opposite the full slip should be slightly soft, and you should be able to smell the fruit’s sweetness subtly shining through, although be careful since an overly strong odor may be an indication of an overripe, fermented fruit. Cantaloupe is so fragrant that you will be able to test for its aroma of ripeness even if you purchase already cut cantaloupe, packaged in a plastic container.
For the most antioxidants, choose fully ripened melon:

Research conducted at the University of Innsbruck in Austria suggests that as fruits fully ripen, almost to the point of spoilage, their antioxidant levels actually increase.
Key to the process is the change in color that occurs as fruits ripen, a similar process to that seen in the fall when leaves turn from green to red to yellow to brown- a color change caused by the breakdown and disappearance of chlorophyll, which gives leaves and fruits their green color.
Until now, no one really knew what happened to chlorophyll during this process, but lead researcher, Bernard Kräutler, and his team, working together with botanists over the past several years, has identified the first decomposition products in leaves: colorless, polar NCCs (nonfluorescing chlorophyll catabolytes), that contain four pyrrole rings – like chlorophyll and heme.
Leaving a firm cantaloupe at room temperature for several days will allow the texture of its flesh to become softer and juicier. Please note that cantaloupe can be left at room temperature only if it is whole, intact, and not yet to the stage of full ripeness.
Once the cantaloupe has reached its peak ripeness, place it in the refrigerator to store. Melon that has been cut should be stored in the refrigerator as well and should be wrapped so as to ensure that the ethylene gas that it emits does not affect the taste or texture of other fruits and vegetables.
Since bacteria can grow on the surface of most melons, it is important to wash the outside of the cantaloupe before cutting into it. After washing, simply slice the melon into pieces of desired thickness and scoop out the seeds and netting. Remember to refrigerate your sliced cantaloupe if you are not going to consume it immediately.
No time to prepare your fruit salad right before serving? You can prepare it several hours ahead or even the day before and still have fresh, flavorful cantaloupe. Simply cut up the fruit while holding it under water. Once again, be sure to refrigerated your cantaloupe immediately after cutting. Looking for a way to keep pre-sliced ready-to-eat cantaloupe fresh longer, USDA Agricultural Research Service scientists found that slicing the fruit when it’s held under water short-circuits the signals plant cells send to each other when they detect an injury, such as being sliced.
No significant losses in phenolic phytonutrients were found in any of the fresh-cut fruit products. “Contrary to expectations, it was clear that minimal processing had almost no effect on the main antioxidant constituents. The changes in nutrient antioxidants observed during nine days at five degrees Celsiuswould not significantly affect the nutrient quality of fresh cut fruit. In general, fresh-cut fruits visually spoil before any significant nutrient loss occurs,” wrote lead researcher Maria Gil.
Cantaloupe is not a commonly allergenic food, is not known to contain measurable amounts of oxalates or purines, and is also not included in the Environmental Working Group’s 2010 report “Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides” as one of the 12 foods most frequently containing pesticide residues.
Nutritional Profile:

Cantaloupe is an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C. It is also a very good source of potassium and a good source of dietary fiber, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6 and folate.<a href=”http://blog.jaykordich.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Fruitbasket.jpg”><img src=”http://blog.jaykordich.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Fruitbasket-807×1024.jpg” alt=”" title=”Fruitbasket” width=”807″ height=”1024″ /></a>

How to Build a Living Kitchen

Love your LIFE and your WIFE!

I like to say that our living kitchen is a manifestation of truly believing specific appliances and loving attitudes actually makes your kitchen your food and your life come alive. Chop wood/carry water is a big part of our living kitchen. We need to begin to feel comfortable in our kitchen, to relax…creating it to become a sanctuary for us. Most of us have negative images in our head and heart about feeling as if we are the ones who ‘have’ to buy produce, prepare meals, clean up after the meals, because the rest of the family is too busy with their lives, so we end up feeling resentful, and unappreciated.

We both work hard in the kitchen, together as a couple!  It’s important that we share the preparation and cleanup of our meals, otherwise, whoever is in charge will start to feel resentful, and resentment cannot be a part of our beautiful new living kitchen, because as you will see if you buy our book, Live Foods/Live Bodies, we dedicate an entire chapter on how to build a living kitchen, from the inside OUT.  Which basically means….it’s not just what we eat that creates harmony and wellness in our lives, but it’s also what we think and what we feel inside that plays a huge role.

Chop wood/carry water is a good example to start to understand this Zen-like approach towards learning to love the discipline and patience it takes to embrace something we need to do everyday of our lives. Let’s face it, we have to face our kitchens more than once, if not twice or three times daily. We are responsible for nourishing ourselves and our families health and wellness. Chop wood/carry water means practicing something on a daily basis with these virtues such as patience and respect, reliability and perseverance laced with love and appreciation, so that in time we become ‘ONE’ with ourselves and our relationship to our kitchen instead of this defunct and dysfunctional daunting responsibility we used to see our kitchens as being.

Here are some ideas how you can start practicing to build your own living kitchen:

1. Keeping our kitchens clean on a daily basis

2. Providing our kitchens with  ”living” appliances (see page 83 in our book, Live Foods/Live Bodies for a description of our Living Appliances)

3. Keeping our mind on beautiful thoughts about those we are cooking for, even if it’s only for ourself.

4. Sustaining our refrigerators with living foods and greens, prepared for juicing and supersalads.

5. lighting a candle in our kitchen to give reverence to Mother Nature, to our loved ones and to our own divine self…. out of gratitude for these gifts and opportunities.

6. Place flowers from your garden onto your kitchen island or near your sink.

7.  Ask yourself every time you prepare a meal, or even when you are eating a meal outside of your home:  ”How much of my meal is Alive?”  This way you will begin to realize just how much cooked food you are eating! Once you get into the habit of asking yourself this question, it will start to come automatic to you, that at least 60% living, raw food needs to be a part of our every meal.

Now that I understand this…then what?

On a saturday, when most of us want to sleep in or go shopping…why not turn on your favorite cd, light a candle and re-do your kitchen? Clean out the pantry, the refrigerator, wash the floors, buy flowers or better yet, pick some fresh herbs from your garden or buy some to make your kitchen smell fragrant. While you are working in your kitchen, you can clean and store your greens for the week and cut your carrots and beets for either juicing or super salads.

Relax into the chop wood/carry water principle. Consistent presence in your kitchen by building these rituals twice a month to ensure your relationship with your kitchen is alive and well is the road to loving your living kitchen.

With consistent dedication laced with love….real devotion and love, your kitchen will start to take on a new face, and you will start to resonate more with seeing it as a sanctuary rather than a place of dis-connection, drudge or duty.

Once you get your kitchen nicely organized, you can start to think about replacing some of the appliances that do not support living health..with empowering “living kitchen” appliances. Then you will start to wake UP to the fact that juicing daily, eating supersalads, keeping a beautiful kitchen is absolutely transforming!

Depending on how old you are, you may well have negative memories relating to nourishment or your kitchens, meals, etc.,. where nobody was home, nobody cared, or if they cared, the food was purchased from restaurants, fast food places, or perhaps put together without much care for nourishment or love. The last place you thought LOVE would live could have been in the kitchen.

Perhaps you had a great experience in your family then, and even now, and that nourishment with either foods or love were not an issue for you….wow what a great platform then for you to build your own Living Kitchen without any real struggles to overcome first….but for a lot of us………..

Your kitchen can be a very stressful place in our home, or it can be a place of relaxation. For those of you who have had trouble identifying yourself in the kitchen as someone who is loved, appreciated and honoured by your family members or even yourself, then you should know this can be changed, altered and if you like….be totally transformed.

For example, let’s take a look at what a transformed kitchen looks like. Most of our kitchens have appliances such as: coffee maker, deep fryer, slow cooker, aluminum and teflon coated cookware and tools, and the obvious ovens, and stoves. These are appliances that truly take our ‘vital’ health away from us. How can we build vitality and living health when our own appliances we have, can’t come near to supporting this new and transformative way of living and being?

Here is what a living kitchen looks and feels like: vital nourishment on every level; physical, mental, spiritual and emotional. Most regular appliances or foods don’t build nourishment whatsoever, yet in our living kitchen, living foods create true nourishment in our bodies. Living juices such as freshly made juices also build nourishment and ‘life’ in our bloodstream as it also builds ‘life’ in our entire being. Our living kitchen also is a wonderful platform for placing our living appliances on the countertops of our kitchens such as…juicers, blenders, soymilk makers, dehydrators, tofu makers, electronic sprouters, electronic herb gardens….wow, can you imagine how incredibly vital you are going to feel and “Be’ … when your kitchen mirrors your quest for you and your loved ones to be healthy, vital and nourished on all levels?

Living the simple life…connecting to real, authentic, unadultered foods and fresh juicing can help us better understand the beauty of natural foods, mother nature and the awesome transforming powers of a working and joyful Living Kitchen.

As Natural Living Food preparers, we really DO work harder everyday in the kitchen, but by using these meditative and loving principles of prayer, gratitude and love for who we are and who we love, helps us ease into these daily kitchen duties with grace.

Hugs to you all from me and Jay ~ and here’s to Joyful Juicing!

Linda Kordich