Category Archives: Anti-Cancer

Pineapple Enzyme found to kill Cancer cells

Jay has long been an advocate for the use of freshly made pineapple juice. When he was an athlete in his early years he did some damage to his knees during his football playing career. He found pineapple juice helped him alleviate the aches and pains in his joints and knees. After studying the properties of pineapple he became aware that it was the enzyme bromelain in fresh pineapple that was responsible for him feeling better.

Bromelain for Natural Healing
Bromelain is actually a group of enzymes in pineapple, known as proteolytic enzymes because they digest protein. For centuries civilizations have used pineapple to treat indigestion and reduce inflammation. Germany approved bromelain to treat swelling and inflammation after surgery as far back as the 1800s. Bromelain is also used to treat infection and injuries.

More recently from a study published in 2007, researchers found that bromelain performed better than a prominent cancer chemo-therapy treatment at inhibiting cancer cell growth in an animal model. The researches said:

“This antitumoral effect [bromelain] was superior to that of 5-FU [5-fluorouracil], whose survival index was approximately 263 %, relative to the untreated control.”

When you consider not only the healing power of bromelain but also unlike highly toxic chemo therapy, which kills not only cancer cells but healthy cells at the same time, bromelain has no such problem. Bromelain does not destroy healthy tissue in the same manner as chemo drugs.

Juicing Advantage

  • Bromelain is concentrated in the core of a pineapple, the tough center that is not usually eaten however juicing it is simple.
  • Enzymes are destroyed during the canning and bottling process. The pineapple must be fresh to receive the benefits from the enzymes.
  • Insert pieces of fresh pineapple with the skin and all into your  juicer. Here is a short video demo that shows the best way to juice pineapple in the Jay Kordich PowerGrind Pro juicer.

Overcoming Disease with Charlotte Gerson

89 year old Charlotte Gerson sat down with jaykordich.com to discuss how to be healthy into your 80s, 90s, and even 100s. It’s a fascinating 48 minutes of great information and perspective from someone who has dedicated her life to helping others overcome serious illness. Gain valuable knowledge by watching this interview conducted only a few months ago.

You can purchase Charlotte’s book, Healing The Gerson Way, along with many books by Charlotte and other important authors by clicking here.

Fresh Gazpacho Soup ~ Living ~ Luscious ~ and Super Easy!

Our Fresh Gazpacho

Here’s our recipe you guys asked to see!  It’s fantastic….loaded with anti-oxidants, Lutein, Enzymes, Phyto-chemicals….

Ingredients

4 Cups (fresh) Tomato Juice (juice approximately 6 ripe Tomatoes)

3 Cups Tomatoes (diced)

1 – 1/2 Cucumbers, (diced)

1/2 Cup Orange or Yellow Bell Pepper (diced)

1/2 Cup Fresh Cilantro (chopped)

2 Stalks Celery (diced or chopped)

2 Ripe Haas Avocados (peeled, pitted and diced)

5 Cloves Garlic (minced)

2 Tbsp. Olive Oil

1-2 Tbsp. Fresh Lemon or Lime Juice

1/2 Cup Green Onions, (chopped for garnish on top of each bowl of soup)

Directions:

In a large mixing bowl, combine all the ingredients except the avocado and mix well.  In a blender, add 1/2 of this mixture and blend until smooth. Pour the blended ingredients back into the mixing bowl.  Cover and refrigerate for 3 to 6 hours.  Serve cold (summertime only) and garnish with chopped gren onions.

The reason why we don’t blend the avocado is because it makes the soup a bit brownish looking as it gets mixed in with the red tomatoes.  To keep the integrity of the redness in the soup, you shouldn’t add the avocados for blending, just keep them as they are (diced).  Plus it adds for more texture in the soup.

Special Notes:

If you want more bulk in this soup to make it more bulky…like the photo below, add the following:

1 Carrot (diced)

1 Zucchini (yellow or green) (diced)

Flax crackers are fantastic with this soup to make for an entire meal.  :)

Hope you enjoy it!!! :)

The HIGHEST Nutritious Tonic! (top 5 shown)

(According to Dr. Koop, here are the TOP TEN highest nutritious Veggies!)

Here is our version for the BEST veggie tonic: (for 2) 10 carrots, 6 flowers of Brussel Sprouts, 1 cup Broccoli, 1 large handful of spinach and 2 green apples. It’s a winner!


1. Broccoli (excellent in juices)

2.  Spinach (excellent in juices)

3.  Brussel Sprouts (excellent in juices)

4.  Lima (not recommended for juicing, unless soaked overnight and then juiced with soaked seeds or nuts.)

5.  Peas (great for juicing and snap peas can be juiced entirely with their pods)

6.  Asparagus (great for juicing)


7.  Artichoke (not recommended for juicing!)  Best steamed  and eaten.


8.  Cauliflower (great for juicing whole)


9.  Sweet Potato (great for juicing and a good substitute for carrots if allergic to carrots)


10. Carrots (fantastic for juicing and is the base for most juicing combinations)

1. Broccoli

Broccoli belongs to the cabbage family (Brassicaceae – to be more specific). The green flower heads and the stalk of the plant are both edible. Broccoli plants are closely related to cauliflowers, although the plants have extremely different colors. Broccoli contains high quantities of vitamin C, soluble fibers and the compound glucoraphanin. Glucoraphanin in broccoli leads to anticancer compound sulforaphane.
Referring to the history of broccoli, the plant was first mentioned in France in 1560 (the name “broccoli” is Italian). 150 years later, in England, the plant was still unknown and was called “sprout colli-flower” or “Italian asparagus”.
During the centuries, broccoli has became a very popular vegetable. The plant is now mentioned in a lot of TV shows, cartoons. There even is a world contest for eating broccoli. The actual champion is Tom “Broccoli” Landers, who ate 1 pound of broccoli in 92 seconds. The secret, he says, is: “Just swallow, don’t bother to chew”.
Eating 100g of raw broccoli can give you (according to the USDA Nutrient database):
Energy – 30 kcal / 140 kJ
Carbohydrates – 5 g
Sugars – 1.7 g
Dietary fiber – 6.64 g
Fat – 0.37 g
Protein – 2.82 g
Thiamin (Vitamin B1) – 0.071 mg (5% of the daily recommended doze for adults)
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) – 0.117 mg (8%)
Niacin (Vitamin B3) – 0.639 mg (4%)
Pantothenic acid (B5) – 0.573 mg (11%)
Vitamin B6 – 0.175 mg (13%)Folate (Vitamin B9) – 63 µg (16%)
Vitamin C – 89.2 mg (149%)
Calcium – 47 mg (5%)
Iron – 0.73 mg (6%)
Magnesium – 21 mg (6%)
Phosphorus – 66 mg (9%)
Potassium – 316 mg (7%)
Zinc – 0.41 mg (4%)
So, by eating 100 g of broccoli, your body gathers two times more vitamin C as compared to oranges. Also, broccoli has only 0.37 g of fat, while chicken breast and steak have 7 g and 18 g, respectively. Broccoli has almost half of the total quantity of calcium in milk (in 100 g of milk there are 113 mg of calcium, while broccoli has 47 mg).
Although it might seem a little strange, broccoli is not seen only as a very healthy and nutritious food.

2. Spinach

Spinach belongs to the Amaranthaceae family, native to central and southwestern Asia. At the beginning, spinach was cultivated in Persia and in 647 arrived to China where it was called “the herb of Persia”.
In the past, spinach was considered to be one of the best sources of iron. In reality, 100 g of raw spinach has 2.7 mg of iron (about 22% of the daily recommended doze for adults), a very high concentration for a vegetable but not as high as people believed in the past.
Still, the quantity of iron made available by spinach for the human body depends on its absorption. Iron enters the body in two forms: heme and nonheme iron. All the iron in grains and vegetables and more than half of the iron in animal food sources is nonheme iron. Heme iron can be found only in meat and in smaller quantities.
Nonheme iron is absorbed much slower as compared to heme iron. Still, the absorption process is influenced by the presence of other elements, like: binders – fiber, enhancers – vitamin C, etc.
So, the good news is that consuming foods rich in vitamin C increases the absorption of iron. However, the bad news is that spinach contains high levels of oxalate, substance that binds with iron to form ferrous oxalate and remove iron from the body (consuming foods with high levels of oxalates will decrease substantially the quantity of iron absorbed by the human body).
A funny thing about spinach is that in 1870, Dr. E. von Wolf published an iron content in spinach that was ten times too high. The scientist misplaced a decimal point in his publication, transforming spinach in the most miraculous vegetable in the world. This lead to numerous stories, including the famous “Popey the sailor man”. Still, the truth was revealed in 1937 by a German chemist who corrected the mistake.
Besides iron, spinach is also a good source of calcium. Calcium absorption, as iron absorption, is influenced by oxalate. The body can only absorb about 5% of the total quantity of calcium in spinach.
Spinach also contains Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, antioxidants and folic acid. The most important nutrients in spinach (100 g), as mentioned in the USDA Nutrient Database, are presented below:
Energy – 20 kcal/100 kj
Carbohydrates – 3.6 g
Sugars – 0.4 g
Dietary fiber – 2.2 g
Fat – 0.4 g
Protein – 2.9 g
Folate (Vitamin B9) – 194 µg (49% of the daily recommended doze for adults)
Vitamin C – 28 mg (47%)
Vitamin E – 2 mg (13%)
Vitamin K – 483 µg (460%)
Calcium – 99 mg (10%)
Iron – 2.7 mg (22%)
Caution: reheating spinach may cause the formation of poisonous compounds that are especially harmful to infants younger than six months.
The nutrients in spinach are very important for red blood cell formation, growth and cell division and protein metabolism. It also contains lutein, a very important antioxidant for eye, skin and cardiovascular health. Vitamin C and vitamin A plus the folic acid and fiber help the body fight cancer, especially colon, lung and breast cancer. Spinach also protects the body against heart diseases and against age related memory loss (flavonoids).

3. Brussels sprouts

The Brussels sprout is part of the cabbage family and it is cultivated for its small leafy green heads, much like miniature cabbages. The name of the Brussels sprout comes from the capital of Belgium: Brussels, as it was first cultivated in this country. Today, this vegetable is cultivated mainly throughout Europe and the United States.
Brussels sprouts are the most hated vegetable in the UK (according to a survey conducted in the UK in 2002). The main reason for this dissatisfaction with Brussels sprouts is that, when overcooked, the vegetable releases sulphurous compounds that give it an unpleasant smell. Thus, Brussels sprout has become a symbol for all vegetables hated by children.
Brussels sprouts are a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin C and folic acid. Also, this vegetable contains high amounts of fiber, potassium and folacin. Brussels sprout is also high in protein, very uncommon for a green vegetable.
According to USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, 100 grams of raw Brussels sprout contains 43 kcal and 0.30 g of fat. The most important nutrients found in this amount of raw Brussels sprout are:
Protein: 3.38g
Carbohydrate: 8.95g
Dietary fiber: 3.8g
Sugars: 2.20g
Calcium: 42mg
Iron: 1.40mg
Magnesium: 23mg
Phosphorus: 69mg
Potassium: 389mg
Manganese: 0.337mg
Vitamin C: 85.0mg
Thiamin (vitamin B1): 0.139mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2): 0.090mg
Niacin (vitamin B3): 0.745mg
Vitamin B6: 0.219mg
Folate: 61mcg
Vitamin A: 754IU
Vitamin K: 177.0mcg
Tryptophan: 0.037g
Carotene, beta: 450mcg
Lutein + zeaxanthin: 1590mcg
The phytochemicals in Brussels sprout, like beta Carotene, Lutein and Zeaxanthin help the natural defense system of the body. Brussels sprouts are particularly good for pregnant women, due to its high amount of folic acid. This nutrient is a B-vitamin needed during the cellular division, as it is essential in DNA synthesis.
It is known that Brussels sprouts’ glucosinolates help prevent colon cancer. In a study, animals were given water supplemented with Brussels sprouts. As a result the development of pre-cancerous cells was reduced by 41-52% in the colon and 27-67% in the liver. Also, the pre-cancerous lesions in the liver were reduced by 85-91%.
There are many ways to cook Brussels sprouts, but it is best to quickly steam or boil it in order to preserve its nutritional value. The main problem when cooking Brussels sprouts is to avoid overcooking in order to prevent the release of bad smells (caused by sulphurous compounds) and loss of nutritious elements.

4. Lima Beans

Very popular in the United States, Lima beans are part of the fabaceae family. Their place of origin is uncertain, but it is believed that they came from the South American country of Peru (the capital of Peru is Lima, from witch this vegetable gets its name) or Guatemala.
The seeds of Lima beans usually have a green or cream color, with a sweet potato-like taste and a grainy, but creamy texture. Among the many varieties of Lima beans, the most common is the Fordhok, also known as butter-beans. Lima beans are very high in molybdenum, tryptophan, dietary fiber and manganese. Also, this vegetable is a good source of folate, potassium, and iron. As we can see in the following list, Lima beans contain a series of nutrients, very helpful to the body. For example, in 100 g of lima beans you can find the followings:
Energy: 38kcal
Protein: 21.46g
Fat: 0.69g
Carbohydrate: 63.38g
Dietary fiber: 19.0g
Sugars: 8.50g
Calcium: 81mg
Iron: 7.51mg
Magnesium: 224mg
Phosphorus: 385mg
Potassium: 1724mg
Thiamin (vitamin B1): 0.507mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2): 0.202mg
Niacin (vitamin B3): 1.537mg
Vitamin B6: 0.512mg
Tryptophan: 0.254g
The source of the data is the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference.
Like any other beans, Lima beans are very rich in dietary fiber. Due to this nutrient, this vegetable lowers the cholesterol and prevents blood glucose (blood sugar) from rising to high. This is very useful for diabetics or people suffering of hypoglycemia.
The trace mineral, molybdenum, found in Lima beans is a component of the sulfite oxidase. This substance is an enzyme that detoxifies sulfites. Sulfites are preservatives used in salads that may cause rapid heartbeats, headaches or disorientation. People may have sensitivity to sulfites because of insufficient sulfite oxidase. 86.5% of the daily requirement of molybdenum can be provided by a cup of Lima beans.
According to the Archives of Internal Medicine, foods that are high in fiber, such as Lima beans can prevent heart disease. A study performed in America (for 19 years) concluded that eating 21 grams of fiber daily, lowers the risk of coronary heart disease by 12% and cardiovascular disease by 11% as compared to eating only 5 grams of fiber every day.
The folate in Lima beans also has cardiovascular benefits by reducing the levels of amino acid called homocysteine. High quantities of homocysteine in blood can cause heart attacks, strokes or peripheral vascular diseases. It is known that eating the total daily requirement of folate lowers the risk of heart attacks by 10%.
Besides fiber and folate, Lima beans have another nutrient that helps the heart: magnesium. This keeps the veins and arteries relaxed and smoothens the flow of blood through the body. Deficiency of magnesium is often associated with heart attacks. A cup of lima beans can offer 20.2% of the daily value of required magnesium.
Combined with whole grain, like brown rice or whole wheat pasta, Lima beans offer about the same quantity of protein as meat or other foods high in calories or fat that could increase your cholesterol level. In fact, a cup of Lima beans has 29.3% of the daily requirement of protein (14.7 grams).

5. Peas

Like Lima beans, peas are part of the fabaceae family. Peas come in many forms, each one having a delicious sweaty flavor, a smooth texture and lots of vitamins and minerals. The most common variety of Peas, are the Green Peas (also known as Garden Peas).
Peas have a very old and interesting history. It seems that Chinese were the first ones to taste this delicious vegetable in year 2000 BC. Through time, peas spread in Asia and Europe. Also, there are mentions of peas in the Bible and evidence that proves that this vegetable was worshipped in Egypt, Greece and Rome. The great producers of today’s peas are the United States, Great Britain, China, Hungary and India.
Peas are quite famous in the genetics community. In the year 1866, the monk and biologist Gregor Mendel published his ideas on heredity. By a selective cross-breeding on common pea plants, Mendel came to conclude his observations in two principles: the principle of segregation and the principle of independent assortment. These two principles of inheritance are today’s modern science of genetics.
Green peas are rich in vitamin C, vitamin K, magnese, dietary fiber, vitamin B1 and folate. Here is the nutritional profile of 100 grams of raw green peas provided by USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference:
Energy: 81kcal
Protein: 5.42g
Fat: 0.40g
Carbohydrate: 14.46g
Dietary fiber: 5.1g
Sugars: 5.67g
Calcium: 25mg
Iron: 1.47mg
Magnesium: 33mg
Phosphorus: 108mg
Potassium: 244mg
Zinc: 1.24mg
Copper: 0.176mg
Manganese: 0.410mg
Vitamin C: 40.0mg
Thiamin (vitamin B1): 0.266mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2): 0.132mg
Niacin (vitamin B3): 2.090mg
Vitamin B6: 0.169mg
Folate: 65mcg
Vitamin A: 765IU
Vitamin K: 24.8mcg
Tryptophan: 0.037g
The high amount of vitamin K1 from green peas makes them very important for your bone health. This vitamin activates a protein called osteocalcin. Without this protein, the absorption of calcium in the bone would not be possible.
In addition to the upper mentioned effects of green peas on calcium absorption, this vegetable is rich in folic acid and vitamin B6 that work together to reduce the levels of homocysteine. Besides affecting the cardiovascular health, this amino acid can conduct to poor bones and osteoporosis by obstructing collagen cross-linking.
Green peas are an excellent way to increase your energy. The vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B6 from green peas are necessary for the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. The iron is necessary for blood cells. Deficiency of iron can result in anemia, fatigue or a week immune system.

Top 10 Reasons to Go Veggie!

  1. Reduce risk of the number 1 killer – heart disease

    Vegetarian diets are naturally lower in saturated fat, and cholesterol, and higher in plant nutrients than most meat-based diets. Vegetarians have been shown to have a 24% lower risk of dying of heart disease than non-vegetarians.1 New Harvard research has shown high consumption of red meat and heme iron may increase the risk of heart disease by 50% amongst diabetics.2 World-renowned physician Dr. Dean Ornish found that patients on a low-fat vegetarian diet actually reversed coronary heart disease.

  2. Cancer prevention

    “Studies have shown that significant reduction in cancer risk among those who avoided meat…Meat is devoid of fiber and other nutrients that have a protective effect. Meat also contains animal protein, saturated fat, and, in some cases, carcinogenic compounds such as heterocyclic amines (HCA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formed during the processing or cooking of meat. HCAs, formed as meat is cooked at high temperatures, and PAHs, formed during the burning of organic substances, are believed to increase cancer risk.

    In addition, the high fat content of meat and other animal products increases hormone production, thus increasing the risk of hormone-related cancers such as breast and prostate cancer….Vegetarian diets and diets rich in high-fiber plant foods such as whole grains, legumes, vegetables, and fruits offer a measure of protection.” 4

    Local Hawaii legend Ruth Heidrich is another great example of the power of a vegetarian diet. Following the advice of Dr. John McDougall, Ruth switched to a vegetarian diet after she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Ruth not only overcame the cancer, she went on to become an award-winning, record-breaking triathlete. She tells her incredible story in the best-selling book, “A Race for Life.” 5

  3. Lose excess weight and keep it off

    On average, vegetarians tend to be slimmer than meat eaters. Obesity rate in the general public is extremely high, while in vegetarians, the obesity rate only ranges from zero to six percent. 6

    A vegetarian diet low in fat and rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes accompanied with daily exercise is the perfect formula for healthy weight loss.

  4. Live longer, slow the aging process

    A 12-year Oxford study published in the British Medical Journal found that vegetarians outlive meat eaters by six years. 7 Plant-based diets are generally rich in fiber, phytonutrients, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, which in turn strengthen the immune system and slow down the aging process.

  5. Avoid toxic food contaminants

    Flesh foods are loaded with dangerous poisons and contaminants such as hormones, herbicides, pesticides, and antibiotics. As these toxins are all fat-soluble, they concentrate in the fatty flesh of animals. Not to mention the viruses, bacteria, and parasites such as salmonella, trichinella and other worms, and toxoplasmosis parasites.

  6. Reduce Global Warming

    The United Nations said in its 2006 report that livestock generate more greenhouse gases than all the cars and trucks in the world combined. 8 Therefore, the single most important step an individual can take to reduce global warming is to adopt a vegetarian diet.

  7. Humans are vegetarian by design.

    Our flat teeth are perfect for grinding grains and vegetables, not for tearing apart animal flesh. Similarly, our hands are designed for gathering, not for flesh-ripping. Our saliva contains the enzyme alpha-amylase, the sole purpose of which is to digest the complex carbohydrates in plant foods. (This enzyme is not found in the saliva of carnivores.) Basically we have all the right apparatus to consume vegetarian products, and none of the right apparatus for flesh foods.

  8. Help end world hunger

    Every day forty thousand children on this planet needlessly starve to death. Crops that could be used to feed the hungry are instead being used to fatten animals raised for food. If everyone on Earth received 25 percent of his or her calories from animal products, only 3.2 billion people could be nourished. If everyone ate a vegetarian diet, there would be more than enough food to nourish the world’s entire population of more than 6.3 billion people. 9

  9. Have compassion for animals

    Animals on today’s factory farms have no legal protection from cruelty that would be illegal if it were inflicted on dogs or cats. Yet farmed animals are no less intelligent or capable of feeling pain than are the dogs and cats we cherish as companions. A vegetarian lifestyle awakens our spirit of compassion and guides us towards a kinder, gentler society in which we exercise a moral choice to protect animals—not exploit them.

  10. Enjoy the diverse, colorful, and delicious world of vegetarian cuisine

    Vegetarian meals can be tasty, fast, and easy. Plus, you can make any of your favorite non-vegetarian dishes by substituting with ready-made meat alternatives. There are lots of vegetarian cookbooks available as well. The Down to Earth all-vegetarian Deli is perfect when you don’t have time to cook but don’t want to compromise on taste and quality.

    Footnotes

    1. Key TJ, Fraser GE, Thorogood M, Appleby PN, Beral V, Reeves G, Burr ML, Chang-Claude J, Frentzel-Beyme R, Kuzma JW, Mann J, McPherson K (1998). “Mortality in vegetarians and non-vegetarians: a collaborative analysis of 8300 deaths among 76,000 men and women in five prospective studies.”. Public Health Nutr 1 (1): 33-41. PMID 10555529.
    2. Lu Qi, MD, PHD, Rob M. van Dam, PHD1, Kathryn Rexrode, MD, MPH and Frank B. Hu, MD, PHD (2007) “Heme Iron From Diet as a Risk Factor for Coronary Heart Disease in Women With Type 2 Diabetes,” American Diabetes Association, Diabetes Care: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/30/1/101
    3. Ornish D, et. al. Intensive lifestyle changes for reversal of coronary heart disease. JAMA 1998; 280(23): 2001-2007. http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/280/23/2001
    4. The Cancer Project, Cancer Prevention and Survival, “Cancer Facts – Meat Consumption and Cancer Risk”:http://www.cancerproject.org/survival/cancer_facts/meat.php
    5. Saltzberg, Rebecca. 10 Reasons to Go Veggie. From PlanetVeggie.
    6. Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Newsrelease, “New scientific review shows vegetarian diets cause major weight loss,” :http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-04/pcfr-nsr033106.php
    7. Key, Timothy J, et al., “Mortality in British vegetarians: review and preliminary results from EPIC-Oxford” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 78, No. 3, 533S-538S, September 2003 http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/533S
    8. “Livestock a major threat to environment,” United Nations FAO Newsroom, Nov. 29, 2006: http://www.fao.org/newsroom/en/news/2006/1000448/index.html
    9. Vegan Outreach, “Try Vegetarian!” Feb. 2004.

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How to Lose Weight in 3 Days with Juicing….and lots of food!

Losing weight, especially when we are over the age of 45 seems impossible.  The truth is, as we age, our metabolism naturally slows, our passion for exercising and enthusiasm just seems a bit skewed.  It’s just natural, as we age, things change for us as our priorities take on different hues.

However, that does not mean we should allow ourselves to stay out of shape, carrying around those extra 20 or 30 pounds.  It’s dangerous on all levels.  So, instead of starving ourselves, and going to the gym with all those young kids, try adopting a 3 day SuperJuicing Diet…and once you finish this diet, you will be raring to workout, even if it’s just on your own recumbent bicycle or taking a long hour walk daily.

If you have a 3 day weekend coming up, or if you are retired, take three days to focus on juicing and within the first 24 hours you may notice something quite surprising!  After the initial taste adjustments, and the few headaches you may encounter as you give up the coffee, alcohol and sugar…… you will notice a naturally balanced surge or energy and your skin will start to glow.

Here’s our 3 day Super-Cleansing Diet ~ Good Luck and don’t hesitate to write to us!

Our 3 Day 100% Living Foods Super-diet for Super-health!

(Please know that all this information we share belongs to me and Linda (copyrighted 2009) and it is not designed for others to copy and own for themselves, without our written expressed permission. We hope you understand! If you have friends that would like a copy, it is free, if they go to our website: www.jaykordich.com and sign up for our newsletters that bring information and updates on our business, including my schedule across America and tv and radio appearances.)
Our Seven Day 100% Living Foods and Juice Diet with Super-Salads
(designed for two people)
Linda and I are sharing some sample recipes from our book: Live Foods/Live Bodies, a 100% vegan and 75% Living Cookbook that we published and is part of our Living Health Program on our website: www.jaykordich.com.
These recipes are foods we use every day, and is basically the way we live and eat on a daily basis. It’s very important to start your day off with green juices.  Also, we like to use the same ingredients for our evening juice as we use for our super-salads, as it makes it easier to prepare meals and also we drink our juice with our dinner to help with digestion as these juices are rich in enzymes to help better our digestive processes.
We also use Super-salads as our evening meals, and since we are not completely raw, sometimes we will use some spinach tortillas, or organic corn homemade tortillas to use in our salads while we are eating, in case we feel like something a bit heavier, but in the spring/summertime we usually don’t add cooked foods into our salads, but in the fall/wintertime we add cooked grains into them and/or tortillas/or flax crackers to balance off all tastes and textures.
We hope you like them!


Day One:

Upon rising:  celery/apple/parsley (3 ribs celery/2 golden apples/one handful of parsley)
(wait 30 minutes before consuming breakfast)
Breakfast: Chopped fresh nectarines and peaches and slivered almonds placed in a bowl with coconut flakes over the top, and fresh almond milk. If it’s wintertime, use apples and pears instead of nectarines and peaches.
Lunch: Green Whopper Salad
3 cups Organic Baby Field greens
1 cup Organic Baby Spinach
1/2 cup Walnuts
1/2 cup Grated Carrots
1 cup Grated zucchini, yellow or green
1 cup quinoa (red is the best!) you can get it at Trader Joe’s
1 large Beefsteak Tomato
1/2 cup Green onions
1 cup Sunflower sprouts
Dressing: Fresh Herb Dressing
1 cup unrefined grape seed oil
2 cloves garlic
1/3 cup yellow onion
1/2 cup fresh spinach and one 1/2 cup fresh parsley and 1/2 cup fresh cilantro and 3/4 cup fresh dill
1 tbsp. Braggs or organic tamari
2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar or Apple cider vinegar
1/2 cup purified water (more or less depending on how thick or thin you like it.)
Dash of cayenne pepper
Blend everything together except the oil. Add the oil last slowing pouring it in to help emulsify it.
Dinner: Super-spinach Super-salad #1
2 cups organic baby leaf spinach
1/2 cup slivered almonds
1/2 cup fresh sliced mushrooms
1/4 cup dried cranberries
1/2 cup julienne green zucchini and cucumber (no seeds)
1/2 cup diced broccoli floweret’s
1 cup Quinoa or 1 cup short grain brown rice
1/2 cup organic green olives or kalamata olives.
1 large or two medium garlic cloves, crushed
Dressing: Olive oil with Bragg’s or Tamari over the top with a bit of fresh lime juice
Juice with Dinner: 18 to 22 carrots/1 cup parsley/1 cup spinach/ 2 granny smith apples/ 1 medium beet.
Before bedtime: Chamomile Tea and Stevia :)

Day 2:

Upon rising:  2 Medium Zucchini or Cucumber, 1 cup Spinach and 2 Pippin Apples
Breakfast: Muesli (raw)
1 cup Steel cut oats
1 cup Purified water
1/2 cup Raisins
1/2 cup Pitted prunes or dates, chopped
1/2 cup Dried apricots, chopped
1/2 cup Apple, grated (pippin or granny smith)
1/4 cup Raw organic almonds, slivered
3 tbsp. Organic honey or Agave Syrup to taste.
Lunch: Tomato and avocado sandwich with slices of wala-wala onions and cucumber slices on top over raw flax bread or 12 grain bread flax bread
Dinner: Supersalad #2
2 cups Baby Field Greens (you can purchase them at the store by bulk or in large plastic containers)
1/2 cup Fresh Basil, chopped
1 cup Romaine Lettuce
2 Organic Beefstake tomatoes
1/2 cup Slivered Wala Wala Onions or sweet onions
1/2 cup Tamari soaked pumpkin seeds
1 Avocado (crushed and placed on top of the salad with the pumpkin seeds
1 cup cooked grain: quinoa, brown rice or millet
Dressing: Barlean’s Flax oil with fresh lemon juice and Nama Shoyu (raw tamari) or Braggs Aminos to taste.
Juice for Dinner: Carrot/apple/beet/basil
20 medium sized carrots/2 apples (golden), 1 medium beet and 1/2 cup basil.


Day 3

Upon rising:  celery/apple/cucumber ~ (3 ribs celery/2 apples/2 medium sized cucumbers)
Breakfast: Super-smoothie: High Protein Nut Smoothie
2 tbsp. each Sunflower Seeds, walnuts and almonds
2 tbsp. Flax Seeds
4 cups Pure Water
1 cup Fresh or frozen berries of your choice
2 tbsp. Agave Syrup or Stevia or Honey
2 tablespoons of Spirulina
Soak the nuts for 15 minutes before blending in purified water. Best to soak them overnight, but 15 minutes will soften them. Put all ingredients in hi speed blender until you are happy with the consistency.
Lunch: Living Soup with flax crackers
Ruby Ambrosia Living Soup
1/2 cup Organic Beet
2 tbsp. Fresh Basil
2 tbsp. Raw Tahini
2 clove Garlic
1/2 cup Fresh lime juice (from the juicer)
1 inch Fresh ginger
1/2 Cucumber (peeled)
1/3 Yellow Onion
2 Medium sized tomatoes, beef stake or heirloom are the best
1/3 tsp. Celery salt
Seasalt and Organic Pepper to taste.
Dinner: Supersalad #4
2 cups Red or Greenleaf Lettuce
1 cup shredded green cabbage
1/3 cup shredded or chopped brussel sprouts
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup shredded jicima
1 cup sunflower seeds
1 cup millet
Dressing: (Macadamia Wonder Dressing)
1/2 cup Olive or Macadamia Oil
1 tsp Organic dijon mustard
2 tbsp. Fresh lemon juice
4 tbsp. Apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup Parlsey
1/4 cup Cilantro
1/4 cup Spinach
1 tsp. Seasalt
Black pepper and Red pepper to taste. Add all ingredients together and blend, but leave oil last and blend slowly into the dressing.
Juice for Dinner: Apple/Parsley/Cilantro/Spinach. 3 golden apples, 1/2 cup parlsey, spinach and cilantro or 4 ribs celery.
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ENJOY NATURE and THESE BEAUTIFUL RAINBOW COLOURED FOODS AND JUICES!

Jay and Linda Kordich

www.jaykordich.com

Freshly Made Vegetable Juices!

Q and A’s …. “Why Juice?”

Q:  Why Juice?  There’s not really a great history of people drinking juices in the world.  We ate food, so where did juices fit into that pattern, before juicers were invented?

A:  We have evolved into something that isn’t the original human body,  so we have had to use other techniques to keep ourselves healthy.

The fact is,  we are the only creature on Earth that cooks our foods.  In the last 50 years, we have also evolved into eating a preponderance of processed foods, so the body has drastically changed and has been forced to compensate.  Throw stress into the mix and we all suffer even more.

At one time, millions of years ago, us humans were only munchers.  Before there was fire, before there were stoves and cookware, man just ate off the land, because that’s all he had.  He had a great digestive tract,  and a tremendous enzyme storehouse.  There wasn’t any white sugar, Gumbies, Cocopuffs, hormones in foods, pollutants in foods, etc.,.  Only Nature.

In the very beginning, man also air dried their meat, and once the meat was attracting maggots, they knew it had the enzymes needed for proper digestion and assimilation.  Sound gross?  Sure it does, but that’s the way to eat meat, if you are going to eat it.  To me, I would never touch it.  I can find all I need in fruits, nuts, seeds, vegetables, legumes, herbs and soaked grains.

Back in those early days of man, he had a working appendix.  That appendix had an oily substance to lubricate the colon as you ate, so man could eat large quantities of fruits and vegetables, greens, etc.,.  Also  the availiability of the nutrients was sixty to seventy percent.  Right now some of us are absorbing only 20% of our nutrients from our foods.  When the body is digesting any food, just remember, all it is in essence, trying to do, is separate the foods from the juices, so the juices can penetrate the intestinal wall, as it is broken down to liquids.  It is only the liquids which permieate through the intestinal wall into the blodostream and through the lier to feed your sixty trillion cells.  The fiber, of course, has to be eliminated through bowel movements, yet the fiber plays an important role….our colons need to be cleaned, so this fiber takes care of keeping the 33 feet (from the opening of our mouths to the bottom) of our intestines and colon healthy.

This is why JUICING is so imperative for us now, in this day of age, due to the fact we are absorbing very little nutrients from the foods we are eating, compounded by the fact that the foods we are usually eating don’t have much food value in them.  When you juice, you are getting 100% of the nutrients from these fruits and vegetables, because they are pre-digested, going into our bloodstream immediately, feeling our 60 trillion cells.  THIS is why we juice.

Jay Kordich answering questions at his seminar, January 2011

Watercress has Anti-Cancer factors

If you are interested in optimum health, living disease free for as long as possible, then you probably already know how important it is to make fresh greens part of your daily food intake.  One of these powerful greens is watercress as we see in scientific studies.

Watercress has properties that have been shown to reduce breast cancer tumors using a protein called HIF, Hypoxia Inducible Factor. The amount needed to show changes was only a 3 ounce serving. This amount would be very easy to add to your green juice combinations. Our new PowerGrind Pro juicer is also great at getting the most out of whatever greens you are juicing.

Here’s a green juice combo:
Watercress, celery, parsley, apple, lime. Add some carrot if you like as well.

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Cantaloupe ~ Nature’s Finest Fruit!

I have been eating cantaloupes for over 80 years. And I have been juicing them for over 62 years, and Linda and I never tire of them.  I want to make sure you are juicing them as well, so I thought I would write a quick note about CANTALOUPES.

How to Juice: Peel your cantaloupes (unless they are organic and scrubbed very well) cut in long strips and juice entire cantaloupe, minus the seeds.  We add some fresh ginger root to the juice in the mornings to give it a little zest.  One cantaloupe (medium size) can juice more than a quart.  NEVER let your cantaloupe juice sit without refrigeration, and if you are saving it, it will only last 5 hours. So it’s best to juice it and then drink it immediately. Vitamin C in the juice along with the natural enzymes and lifeforce start to die immediately after you break open the cells of the fruit.
Here’s the Benefits:

Cantaloupe Gets an A+
Our food ranking system qualified cantaloupe as an excellent source of vitamin A on account of its concentrated beta-carotene content. Once inside the body, beta-carotene can be converted into vitamin A, so when you eat cantaloupe it’s like getting both these beneficial nutrients at once. One cup of cantaloupe is just 56 calories, but provides 103.2% of the daily value for vitamin A. Both vitamin A and beta-carotene are important vision nutrients. In a study of over 50,000 women nurses aged 45 to 67, women who consumed the highest dietary amount of vitamin A had a 39% reduced risk of developing cataracts. In another study that looked at the incidence of cataract surgery and diet, researchers found that those people who ate diets that included cantaloupe had half the risk of cataract surgery, while those who ate the highest amounts of butter, salt and total fat had higher risks for cataract surgery. Beta-carotene has also been the subject of extensive research in relationship to cancer prevention and prevention of oxygen-based damage to cells.
Cantaloupe also emerged from our food ranking system as an excellent source of vitamin C. While beta-carotene and vitamin A are fat-soluble antioxidants, vitamin C functions as an antioxidant in the water-soluble areas of the body. So, between its beta-carotene and vitamin C content, cantaloupe has all areas covered against damage from oxygen free radicals. In addition to its antioxidant activity, vitamin C is critical for good immune function. Vitamin C stimulates white cells to fight infection, directly kills many bacteria and viruses, and regenerates Vitamin E after it has been inactivated by disarming free radicals. Owing to the multitude of vitamin C’s health benefits, it is not surprising that research has shown that consumption of vegetables and fruits high in this nutrient is associated with a reduced risk of death from all causes including heart disease, stroke and cancer. One cup of cantaloupe contains 112.5% of the daily value for this well-known antioxidant.
In our food ranking system, cantaloupe also qualified as a very good source of potassium and a good source of vitamin B6,dietary fiber, folate, and niacin (vitamin B3). The combination of all these B complex vitamins along with the fiber found in cantaloupe make it an exceptionally good fruit for supporting energy production through good carbohydrate metabolism and blood sugar stability. These B complex vitamins are required in our cells for processing carbohydrates (including sugars), and cantaloupe’s fiber helps ensure cantaloupe’s sugars are delivered into the bloodstream gradually, keeping blood sugar on an even keel.
Cantaloupe’s Pro-vitamin A Promotes Lung Health.
If you or someone you love is a smoker, or if you are frequently exposed to secondhand smoke, then making vitamin A-rich foods, such as cantaloupe, part of your healthy way of eating may save your life, suggests research conducted at Kansas State University.
While studying the relationship between vitamin A, lung inflammation, and emphysema, Richard Baybutt, associate professor of nutrition at Kansas State, made a surprising discovery: a common carcinogen in cigarette smoke, benzo(a)pyrene, induces vitamin A deficiency.
Baybutt’s earlier research had shown that animals fed a vitamin A-deficient diet developed emphysema. His latest animal studies indicate that not only does the benzo(a)pyrene in cigarette smoke cause vitamin A deficiency, but that a diet rich in vitamin A can help counter this effect, thus greatly reducing emphysema.
Baybutt believes vitamin A’s protective effects may help explain why some smokers do not develop emphysema. “There are a lot of people who live to be 90 years old and are smokers,” he said. “Why? Probably because of their diet…The implications are that those who start smoking at an early age are more likely to become vitamin A deficient and develop complications associated with cancer and emphysema. And if they have a poor diet, forget it.”
If you or someone you love smokes, or if your work necessitates exposure to second hand smoke, protect yourself by making sure that at least one of the World’s Healthiest Foods that are rich in vitamin A, such as cantaloupe, is a daily part of your healthy way of eating.

Protect Your Vision with Cantaloupe
Your mother may have told you carrots would keep your eyes bright as a child, but as an adult, it looks like fruit is even more important for keeping your sight. Data reported in a study published in the Archives of Ophthalmology indicates that eating 3 or more servings of fruit per day may lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the primary cause of vision loss in older adults, by 36%, compared to persons who consume less than 1.5 servings of fruit daily.
In this study, which involved over 100,000 women and men, researchers evaluated the effect of study participants’ consumption of fruits; vegetables; the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E; and carotenoids on the development of early ARMD or neovascular ARMD, a more severe form of the illness associated with vision loss. Food intake information was collected periodically for up to 18 years for women and 12 years for men.
While, surprisingly, intakes of vegetables, antioxidant vitamins and carotenoids were not strongly related to incidence of either form of ARMD, fruit intake was definitely protective against the severe form of this vision-destroying disease.
Three servings of fruit may sound like a lot to eat each day, but by simply slicing some cantaloupe over your morning cereal, topping off a cup of yogurt or green salad with a half cup of berries, and snacking on an apple, plum, nectarine or pear, you’ve reached this goal.
Description

The fruit that we call the cantaloupe is, in actuality, really a muskmelon. The true cantaloupe is a different species of melon that is mostly grown in France and rarely found in the United States. It derives its name from the Italian papal village of Cantalup where it was first cultivated around 1700 A.D. From hereon, we will still use the term “cantaloupe” when referring to the muskmelon.
The cantaloupe is a melon that belongs to the same family as the cucumber, squash, pumpkin and gourd, and like many of its relatives, it grows on the ground on a trailing vine. It is round or oval in shape and usually has a ribless rind. Having a distinctive netted skin, it is also referred to as netted melon. Many of the cantaloupes available today are hybrids of muskmelons and true cantaloupes and have qualities that reflect both.
Cantaloupes range in color from orange-yellow to salmon and have a soft and juicy texture with a sweet, musky aroma that emanates through the melon when it is ripe. Cantaloupes feature a hollow cavity that contains their seeds encased in a web of netting.
Cantaloupe is also known as rockmelon in several parts of the world. The scientific name for cantaloupe is Cucumis melo.
History
The exact origin of melons is unclear, although they are thought to have originated in either India, Africa or ancient Persia and have been cultivated in these lands since ancient times. Historical texts from Greek and Roman times note that these ancient civilizations enjoyed cantaloupes. They were introduced to the United States during colonial times but were not grown commercially until the very late 19th century. Today, major growers of cantaloupe include the United States, Turkey, Iran and many Central American countries.
How to Select and Store
The key to purchasing a good quality melon is to find one that is ripe, which is sometimes a challenge because oftentimes they are picked while still unripe in order to ensure that they make it through the shipping process undamaged. There are many clues that you can look for to find a melon that is ripe. If you tap the melon with the palm of your hand and hear a hollow sound, the melon has passed the first test.
Choose a melon that seems heavy for its size, and one that does not have bruises or overly soft spots. The rind, underneath the netting, should have turned to yellow or cream from the green undertones that the unripe fruit has. The “full slip,” the area where the stem was attached, should be smooth and slightly indented, free from remnants of the stem. The end opposite the full slip should be slightly soft, and you should be able to smell the fruit’s sweetness subtly shining through, although be careful since an overly strong odor may be an indication of an overripe, fermented fruit. Cantaloupe is so fragrant that you will be able to test for its aroma of ripeness even if you purchase already cut cantaloupe, packaged in a plastic container.
For the most antioxidants, choose fully ripened melon:

Research conducted at the University of Innsbruck in Austria suggests that as fruits fully ripen, almost to the point of spoilage, their antioxidant levels actually increase.
Key to the process is the change in color that occurs as fruits ripen, a similar process to that seen in the fall when leaves turn from green to red to yellow to brown- a color change caused by the breakdown and disappearance of chlorophyll, which gives leaves and fruits their green color.
Until now, no one really knew what happened to chlorophyll during this process, but lead researcher, Bernard Kräutler, and his team, working together with botanists over the past several years, has identified the first decomposition products in leaves: colorless, polar NCCs (nonfluorescing chlorophyll catabolytes), that contain four pyrrole rings – like chlorophyll and heme.
Leaving a firm cantaloupe at room temperature for several days will allow the texture of its flesh to become softer and juicier. Please note that cantaloupe can be left at room temperature only if it is whole, intact, and not yet to the stage of full ripeness.
Once the cantaloupe has reached its peak ripeness, place it in the refrigerator to store. Melon that has been cut should be stored in the refrigerator as well and should be wrapped so as to ensure that the ethylene gas that it emits does not affect the taste or texture of other fruits and vegetables.
Since bacteria can grow on the surface of most melons, it is important to wash the outside of the cantaloupe before cutting into it. After washing, simply slice the melon into pieces of desired thickness and scoop out the seeds and netting. Remember to refrigerate your sliced cantaloupe if you are not going to consume it immediately.
No time to prepare your fruit salad right before serving? You can prepare it several hours ahead or even the day before and still have fresh, flavorful cantaloupe. Simply cut up the fruit while holding it under water. Once again, be sure to refrigerated your cantaloupe immediately after cutting. Looking for a way to keep pre-sliced ready-to-eat cantaloupe fresh longer, USDA Agricultural Research Service scientists found that slicing the fruit when it’s held under water short-circuits the signals plant cells send to each other when they detect an injury, such as being sliced.
No significant losses in phenolic phytonutrients were found in any of the fresh-cut fruit products. “Contrary to expectations, it was clear that minimal processing had almost no effect on the main antioxidant constituents. The changes in nutrient antioxidants observed during nine days at five degrees Celsiuswould not significantly affect the nutrient quality of fresh cut fruit. In general, fresh-cut fruits visually spoil before any significant nutrient loss occurs,” wrote lead researcher Maria Gil.
Cantaloupe is not a commonly allergenic food, is not known to contain measurable amounts of oxalates or purines, and is also not included in the Environmental Working Group’s 2010 report “Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides” as one of the 12 foods most frequently containing pesticide residues.
Nutritional Profile:

Cantaloupe is an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C. It is also a very good source of potassium and a good source of dietary fiber, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6 and folate.<a href=”http://blog.jaykordich.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Fruitbasket.jpg”><img src=”http://blog.jaykordich.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Fruitbasket-807×1024.jpg” alt=”" title=”Fruitbasket” width=”807″ height=”1024″ /></a>

Broccoli Linked to Decreased Prostate Cancer

Researchers Victoria Kirsh, Ph.D., of Cancer Care Ontario in Toronto and her colleagues investigated a possible connection between consuming more cruciferous vegetables, specifically broccoli, and cancer risk overall. Their results indicated a larger intake of dark green and cruciferous vegetables, especially broccoli, was associated with decreased risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

To make the most of your fresh broccoli purchases, use the florets in your salads and use the stalk in your juice. A great recipe is a few carrots, an apple, 1/4 to 1/2 stalk broccoli and a stalk of celery.

National Cancer Research study article here.