Category Archives: Broccoli

Boost Heart Health With Broccoli & Cruciferous Vegetables

One of the stars among vegetables is the group called cruciferous. These include broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage. Research is pointing to their special qualities with ability to boost health on a number of different levels, including heart and arteries as well as cancer.

Your Secret To Good Health – Prevent Inflammation

More and more science is showing how inflammation can trigger a downward spiral of disease conditions in the body and how the foods we eat have a direct result on preventing it from getting out of control. Eliminating foods that cause this condition is one side of the equation.  The other side is adding foods that have the ability to lower inflammation. We need to do both of these, if our goal is to help our bodies fight off disease and build our immune systems for strong, long term health.

Broccoli contains a natural compound called sulforaphane which has been shown to reduce inflammation at the high-risk areas in arteries – the places where plaque builds up and begins to prevent blood flow at critical points in our circulatory system. This condition is called Atherosclerosis and it can lead to angina, heart attack and stroke. Cruciferous vegetables all contain sulforaphane, however broccoli has one of the largest amounts and is being studied for it’s effect on preventing artery plaque buildup.

have already seen that sulforaphane can prevent inflammation in arterial walls and now they are expanding the studies to see if this compound can also prevent the progression of already existing atherosclerosis conditions.

Easily Jump Start Your Health Today with Broccoli

While the scientists are doing their best to document the various benefits of broccoli and the others in this group of vegetables, we have no reason to wait around and see what they come up with. We can all make a glass of nutritious vegetable juice that includes broccoli right now. Include cruciferous vegetables in your raw salads too.

Here is a vegetable juice recipe that we recommend.

RECIPE – Veggie Juice with Broccoli

- Handful of broccoli tops or inch section of stalk, cut into 1/2 inch pieces.
- Three carrots
- 1 to 2 inch section cucumber
- 1 stalk celery
- 1/2 lime
- 1/2 or 1 apple

 

 

 

 

Broccoli Studied for Cancer Prevention

As we have written previously, broccoli has been shown in numerous studies to help in the prevention of many different types of cancer. The properties being studied are in the group of cruciferous vegetables that include not only broccoli but also brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage. They can contain significant quantities of glucosinolates, which are metabolized into isothiocyanates (ITCs). The ITC sulforaphane (SF) is now being studied for the strong connection of it’s ability to destroy cancer cells in lab experiments.

We are seeing more and more evidence that increased dietary consumption of SF-containing cruciferous vegetables is showing a reduction of chronic and degenerative disease. Science has suggested a number of possible mechanisms for the relationship between less disease and the larger amount of SF in the diet but the strongest evidence continues to be the vehicle of SF’s role in metabolizing antioxidant enzymes.

Also of particular interest are the sprouts of broccoli which have been observed to include 10 to 100 times the amount of enzyme inducers that protect against carcinogens. Just like you have the ability to make your own glass of great tasting vegetable juice at home that includes broccoli or cabbage, it’s also easy to grow your own sprouts as well.

Here’s a tip for using broccoli in your green juices. While it’s true the florets of broccoli are higher in beta-carotene, the stalks provide large amount of the researched nutrients mentioned above. Use the stalks when juicing with your Jay Kordich PowerGrind Pro juicer because they are sometimes not easy to consume in raw salads. If you also were to grow your own broccoli sprouts and add them to your salads and sandwiches, this would provide optimum levels of all the cancer-preventing nutrients of the resent studies.

Here’s Jay making a green juice combination. Simply add half a stalk of broccoli to the recipe in this video for a great tasting and nutritious glass of juice.

Cruciferous Vegetables; The Good, The Bad and the Confusing….

Recently we have been hearing about the negative impact juicing kale, spinach, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables may have that is causing or may cause goitrogenic effects (goiter inducing).  Some research is saying that juicing these veggies creates a negative experience on the body, when juiced.  Steaming, cooking and/or boiling them is suggested, and the longer the better. (30 minutes).

This kind of recent research makes me pause a bit because, based on our past history, 30 plus years for me and 63 years for Jay, it does not make sense to say that cruciferous greens or goitrogenic foods (goiter inducing) needs to be cooked in order for them to not provoke the thyroid in negative ways.

For example, Dr. Garnet Chaney did a powerfully extensive study on cabbage juice and how it literally cured stomach ulcers.  He and Jay participated in this study back in the 1960′s with prisoners who were suffering from stomach ulcers; (duodenal and peptic) and found that almost 90% of these ulcers were healed with 60 to 90 days after consuming fresh cabbage juices on a daily basis.  Even the British Journal, Lancet showed these powerfully enlightening studies.  When they tested cooked cabbage on the ulcers, there was no response.

Further, Dr. Walker, Jay’s mentor and master teacher on juicing from the 1930′s through to the mid 1980′s, has said in his book, Raw Vegetable Juices, where he speaks very highly of fresh green juices, including cruciferous vegetables, stating that they are better digested and consumed in juice form.

That being said, we eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables in our salads, so we do eat them, but we also realize that eating broccoli is harder to consume than juicing it.  Sometimes we even steam them.

However, we feel that drinking liquid broccoli juice is by far more concentrated and digestible in juice form than to eat three or four cups!  Yet…we like to mix up juicing them with other vegetables.

We have been juicing spinach and other cruciferous veggies for many decades, with no goiter abnormalities with our Thyroid whatsoever.  We also have not been eating salt like “Mortons” Salt which is inflused with extra iodine. We use highly mineralized salts like Himalayan Salts or Pink Mineral Salt (Celtic Salts).  And we eat lots of seaweed on a weekly basis, particularly, I do because of post menopausal symptoms feel better when I eat seaweed.  These types of salts have a natural balance of all minerals, including iodine.

On the other hand, we have never suggested drinking pure kale juice, or broccoli juice straight. We recommend always, that greens be combined with other greens or other veggies for better asorption and for concentrated benefits specifically designed for a particular part of the body.

We may be old fashioned, but all of our great Master Teachers from the past; Dr. Norman Walker, Dr. Max Gerson and John Lust never spoke about the dangers of consuming kale juice or broccoli or cauliflower juices.  On the contrary, they speak highly of the healing benefits to the breast area of our bodies, whether we are men or women.

We like to imagine all these dedicated doctors from the past, including our combined 100 years of studying, observing and teaching by far outweighs a few articles that say that goitrogens may cause thyroid distress.  That does not mean we are dead set against some of this research coming out about the juices inhibiting the thyroid’s ability to do its job.

All we are saying is that we all may want to observe the research, and then find out for ourselves what feels comfortable, based on our own experiences with these foods…. but please don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater until more research is found, and always check to see ‘who’ is conducting the research.

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In Wikipedia:

Here are “Goitrogenic” Foods:

Goitrogenic foods

Certain raw foods (cooking inactivates the goitrogens) have been identified as lightly goitrogenic. These foods include:

  • cassava
  • Soybeans (and soybean products such as tofu, soybean oil, soy flour, soy lecithin)
  • Pine nuts
  • Peanuts
  • Millet
  • Strawberries
  • Pears
  • Peaches
  • Spinach
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Vegetables in the genus Brassica [5]
    • Bok choy
    • Broccoli
    • Broccolini (Asparations)
    • Brussels sprouts
    • Cabbage
    • Canola
    • Cauliflower
    • Chinese cabbage
    • Choy sum
    • Collard greens
    • Horseradish
    • Kai-lan (Chinese broccoli)
    • Kale
    • Kohlrabi
    • Mizuna
    • Mustard greens
    • Radishes
    • Rapeseed (yu choy)
    • Rapini
    • Rutabagas
    • Tatsoi
    • Turnips

The HIGHEST Nutritious Tonic! (top 5 shown)

(According to Dr. Koop, here are the TOP TEN highest nutritious Veggies!)

Here is our version for the BEST veggie tonic: (for 2) 10 carrots, 6 flowers of Brussel Sprouts, 1 cup Broccoli, 1 large handful of spinach and 2 green apples. It’s a winner!


1. Broccoli (excellent in juices)

2.  Spinach (excellent in juices)

3.  Brussel Sprouts (excellent in juices)

4.  Lima (not recommended for juicing, unless soaked overnight and then juiced with soaked seeds or nuts.)

5.  Peas (great for juicing and snap peas can be juiced entirely with their pods)

6.  Asparagus (great for juicing)


7.  Artichoke (not recommended for juicing!)  Best steamed  and eaten.


8.  Cauliflower (great for juicing whole)


9.  Sweet Potato (great for juicing and a good substitute for carrots if allergic to carrots)


10. Carrots (fantastic for juicing and is the base for most juicing combinations)

1. Broccoli

Broccoli belongs to the cabbage family (Brassicaceae – to be more specific). The green flower heads and the stalk of the plant are both edible. Broccoli plants are closely related to cauliflowers, although the plants have extremely different colors. Broccoli contains high quantities of vitamin C, soluble fibers and the compound glucoraphanin. Glucoraphanin in broccoli leads to anticancer compound sulforaphane.
Referring to the history of broccoli, the plant was first mentioned in France in 1560 (the name “broccoli” is Italian). 150 years later, in England, the plant was still unknown and was called “sprout colli-flower” or “Italian asparagus”.
During the centuries, broccoli has became a very popular vegetable. The plant is now mentioned in a lot of TV shows, cartoons. There even is a world contest for eating broccoli. The actual champion is Tom “Broccoli” Landers, who ate 1 pound of broccoli in 92 seconds. The secret, he says, is: “Just swallow, don’t bother to chew”.
Eating 100g of raw broccoli can give you (according to the USDA Nutrient database):
Energy – 30 kcal / 140 kJ
Carbohydrates – 5 g
Sugars – 1.7 g
Dietary fiber – 6.64 g
Fat – 0.37 g
Protein – 2.82 g
Thiamin (Vitamin B1) – 0.071 mg (5% of the daily recommended doze for adults)
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) – 0.117 mg (8%)
Niacin (Vitamin B3) – 0.639 mg (4%)
Pantothenic acid (B5) – 0.573 mg (11%)
Vitamin B6 – 0.175 mg (13%)Folate (Vitamin B9) – 63 µg (16%)
Vitamin C – 89.2 mg (149%)
Calcium – 47 mg (5%)
Iron – 0.73 mg (6%)
Magnesium – 21 mg (6%)
Phosphorus – 66 mg (9%)
Potassium – 316 mg (7%)
Zinc – 0.41 mg (4%)
So, by eating 100 g of broccoli, your body gathers two times more vitamin C as compared to oranges. Also, broccoli has only 0.37 g of fat, while chicken breast and steak have 7 g and 18 g, respectively. Broccoli has almost half of the total quantity of calcium in milk (in 100 g of milk there are 113 mg of calcium, while broccoli has 47 mg).
Although it might seem a little strange, broccoli is not seen only as a very healthy and nutritious food.

2. Spinach

Spinach belongs to the Amaranthaceae family, native to central and southwestern Asia. At the beginning, spinach was cultivated in Persia and in 647 arrived to China where it was called “the herb of Persia”.
In the past, spinach was considered to be one of the best sources of iron. In reality, 100 g of raw spinach has 2.7 mg of iron (about 22% of the daily recommended doze for adults), a very high concentration for a vegetable but not as high as people believed in the past.
Still, the quantity of iron made available by spinach for the human body depends on its absorption. Iron enters the body in two forms: heme and nonheme iron. All the iron in grains and vegetables and more than half of the iron in animal food sources is nonheme iron. Heme iron can be found only in meat and in smaller quantities.
Nonheme iron is absorbed much slower as compared to heme iron. Still, the absorption process is influenced by the presence of other elements, like: binders – fiber, enhancers – vitamin C, etc.
So, the good news is that consuming foods rich in vitamin C increases the absorption of iron. However, the bad news is that spinach contains high levels of oxalate, substance that binds with iron to form ferrous oxalate and remove iron from the body (consuming foods with high levels of oxalates will decrease substantially the quantity of iron absorbed by the human body).
A funny thing about spinach is that in 1870, Dr. E. von Wolf published an iron content in spinach that was ten times too high. The scientist misplaced a decimal point in his publication, transforming spinach in the most miraculous vegetable in the world. This lead to numerous stories, including the famous “Popey the sailor man”. Still, the truth was revealed in 1937 by a German chemist who corrected the mistake.
Besides iron, spinach is also a good source of calcium. Calcium absorption, as iron absorption, is influenced by oxalate. The body can only absorb about 5% of the total quantity of calcium in spinach.
Spinach also contains Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, antioxidants and folic acid. The most important nutrients in spinach (100 g), as mentioned in the USDA Nutrient Database, are presented below:
Energy – 20 kcal/100 kj
Carbohydrates – 3.6 g
Sugars – 0.4 g
Dietary fiber – 2.2 g
Fat – 0.4 g
Protein – 2.9 g
Folate (Vitamin B9) – 194 µg (49% of the daily recommended doze for adults)
Vitamin C – 28 mg (47%)
Vitamin E – 2 mg (13%)
Vitamin K – 483 µg (460%)
Calcium – 99 mg (10%)
Iron – 2.7 mg (22%)
Caution: reheating spinach may cause the formation of poisonous compounds that are especially harmful to infants younger than six months.
The nutrients in spinach are very important for red blood cell formation, growth and cell division and protein metabolism. It also contains lutein, a very important antioxidant for eye, skin and cardiovascular health. Vitamin C and vitamin A plus the folic acid and fiber help the body fight cancer, especially colon, lung and breast cancer. Spinach also protects the body against heart diseases and against age related memory loss (flavonoids).

3. Brussels sprouts

The Brussels sprout is part of the cabbage family and it is cultivated for its small leafy green heads, much like miniature cabbages. The name of the Brussels sprout comes from the capital of Belgium: Brussels, as it was first cultivated in this country. Today, this vegetable is cultivated mainly throughout Europe and the United States.
Brussels sprouts are the most hated vegetable in the UK (according to a survey conducted in the UK in 2002). The main reason for this dissatisfaction with Brussels sprouts is that, when overcooked, the vegetable releases sulphurous compounds that give it an unpleasant smell. Thus, Brussels sprout has become a symbol for all vegetables hated by children.
Brussels sprouts are a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin C and folic acid. Also, this vegetable contains high amounts of fiber, potassium and folacin. Brussels sprout is also high in protein, very uncommon for a green vegetable.
According to USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, 100 grams of raw Brussels sprout contains 43 kcal and 0.30 g of fat. The most important nutrients found in this amount of raw Brussels sprout are:
Protein: 3.38g
Carbohydrate: 8.95g
Dietary fiber: 3.8g
Sugars: 2.20g
Calcium: 42mg
Iron: 1.40mg
Magnesium: 23mg
Phosphorus: 69mg
Potassium: 389mg
Manganese: 0.337mg
Vitamin C: 85.0mg
Thiamin (vitamin B1): 0.139mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2): 0.090mg
Niacin (vitamin B3): 0.745mg
Vitamin B6: 0.219mg
Folate: 61mcg
Vitamin A: 754IU
Vitamin K: 177.0mcg
Tryptophan: 0.037g
Carotene, beta: 450mcg
Lutein + zeaxanthin: 1590mcg
The phytochemicals in Brussels sprout, like beta Carotene, Lutein and Zeaxanthin help the natural defense system of the body. Brussels sprouts are particularly good for pregnant women, due to its high amount of folic acid. This nutrient is a B-vitamin needed during the cellular division, as it is essential in DNA synthesis.
It is known that Brussels sprouts’ glucosinolates help prevent colon cancer. In a study, animals were given water supplemented with Brussels sprouts. As a result the development of pre-cancerous cells was reduced by 41-52% in the colon and 27-67% in the liver. Also, the pre-cancerous lesions in the liver were reduced by 85-91%.
There are many ways to cook Brussels sprouts, but it is best to quickly steam or boil it in order to preserve its nutritional value. The main problem when cooking Brussels sprouts is to avoid overcooking in order to prevent the release of bad smells (caused by sulphurous compounds) and loss of nutritious elements.

4. Lima Beans

Very popular in the United States, Lima beans are part of the fabaceae family. Their place of origin is uncertain, but it is believed that they came from the South American country of Peru (the capital of Peru is Lima, from witch this vegetable gets its name) or Guatemala.
The seeds of Lima beans usually have a green or cream color, with a sweet potato-like taste and a grainy, but creamy texture. Among the many varieties of Lima beans, the most common is the Fordhok, also known as butter-beans. Lima beans are very high in molybdenum, tryptophan, dietary fiber and manganese. Also, this vegetable is a good source of folate, potassium, and iron. As we can see in the following list, Lima beans contain a series of nutrients, very helpful to the body. For example, in 100 g of lima beans you can find the followings:
Energy: 38kcal
Protein: 21.46g
Fat: 0.69g
Carbohydrate: 63.38g
Dietary fiber: 19.0g
Sugars: 8.50g
Calcium: 81mg
Iron: 7.51mg
Magnesium: 224mg
Phosphorus: 385mg
Potassium: 1724mg
Thiamin (vitamin B1): 0.507mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2): 0.202mg
Niacin (vitamin B3): 1.537mg
Vitamin B6: 0.512mg
Tryptophan: 0.254g
The source of the data is the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference.
Like any other beans, Lima beans are very rich in dietary fiber. Due to this nutrient, this vegetable lowers the cholesterol and prevents blood glucose (blood sugar) from rising to high. This is very useful for diabetics or people suffering of hypoglycemia.
The trace mineral, molybdenum, found in Lima beans is a component of the sulfite oxidase. This substance is an enzyme that detoxifies sulfites. Sulfites are preservatives used in salads that may cause rapid heartbeats, headaches or disorientation. People may have sensitivity to sulfites because of insufficient sulfite oxidase. 86.5% of the daily requirement of molybdenum can be provided by a cup of Lima beans.
According to the Archives of Internal Medicine, foods that are high in fiber, such as Lima beans can prevent heart disease. A study performed in America (for 19 years) concluded that eating 21 grams of fiber daily, lowers the risk of coronary heart disease by 12% and cardiovascular disease by 11% as compared to eating only 5 grams of fiber every day.
The folate in Lima beans also has cardiovascular benefits by reducing the levels of amino acid called homocysteine. High quantities of homocysteine in blood can cause heart attacks, strokes or peripheral vascular diseases. It is known that eating the total daily requirement of folate lowers the risk of heart attacks by 10%.
Besides fiber and folate, Lima beans have another nutrient that helps the heart: magnesium. This keeps the veins and arteries relaxed and smoothens the flow of blood through the body. Deficiency of magnesium is often associated with heart attacks. A cup of lima beans can offer 20.2% of the daily value of required magnesium.
Combined with whole grain, like brown rice or whole wheat pasta, Lima beans offer about the same quantity of protein as meat or other foods high in calories or fat that could increase your cholesterol level. In fact, a cup of Lima beans has 29.3% of the daily requirement of protein (14.7 grams).

5. Peas

Like Lima beans, peas are part of the fabaceae family. Peas come in many forms, each one having a delicious sweaty flavor, a smooth texture and lots of vitamins and minerals. The most common variety of Peas, are the Green Peas (also known as Garden Peas).
Peas have a very old and interesting history. It seems that Chinese were the first ones to taste this delicious vegetable in year 2000 BC. Through time, peas spread in Asia and Europe. Also, there are mentions of peas in the Bible and evidence that proves that this vegetable was worshipped in Egypt, Greece and Rome. The great producers of today’s peas are the United States, Great Britain, China, Hungary and India.
Peas are quite famous in the genetics community. In the year 1866, the monk and biologist Gregor Mendel published his ideas on heredity. By a selective cross-breeding on common pea plants, Mendel came to conclude his observations in two principles: the principle of segregation and the principle of independent assortment. These two principles of inheritance are today’s modern science of genetics.
Green peas are rich in vitamin C, vitamin K, magnese, dietary fiber, vitamin B1 and folate. Here is the nutritional profile of 100 grams of raw green peas provided by USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference:
Energy: 81kcal
Protein: 5.42g
Fat: 0.40g
Carbohydrate: 14.46g
Dietary fiber: 5.1g
Sugars: 5.67g
Calcium: 25mg
Iron: 1.47mg
Magnesium: 33mg
Phosphorus: 108mg
Potassium: 244mg
Zinc: 1.24mg
Copper: 0.176mg
Manganese: 0.410mg
Vitamin C: 40.0mg
Thiamin (vitamin B1): 0.266mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2): 0.132mg
Niacin (vitamin B3): 2.090mg
Vitamin B6: 0.169mg
Folate: 65mcg
Vitamin A: 765IU
Vitamin K: 24.8mcg
Tryptophan: 0.037g
The high amount of vitamin K1 from green peas makes them very important for your bone health. This vitamin activates a protein called osteocalcin. Without this protein, the absorption of calcium in the bone would not be possible.
In addition to the upper mentioned effects of green peas on calcium absorption, this vegetable is rich in folic acid and vitamin B6 that work together to reduce the levels of homocysteine. Besides affecting the cardiovascular health, this amino acid can conduct to poor bones and osteoporosis by obstructing collagen cross-linking.
Green peas are an excellent way to increase your energy. The vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B6 from green peas are necessary for the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. The iron is necessary for blood cells. Deficiency of iron can result in anemia, fatigue or a week immune system.

Broccoli Linked to Decreased Prostate Cancer

Researchers Victoria Kirsh, Ph.D., of Cancer Care Ontario in Toronto and her colleagues investigated a possible connection between consuming more cruciferous vegetables, specifically broccoli, and cancer risk overall. Their results indicated a larger intake of dark green and cruciferous vegetables, especially broccoli, was associated with decreased risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

To make the most of your fresh broccoli purchases, use the florets in your salads and use the stalk in your juice. A great recipe is a few carrots, an apple, 1/4 to 1/2 stalk broccoli and a stalk of celery.

National Cancer Research study article here.